“I remember his first show at Long March Space in 2010, which really caught my eye,” says independent critic Lee Ambrozy. For this project, the artist cut into the floor and transgressed the gallery space, creating a cityscape with skyscrapers and steel scaffolding. “From one perspective you are seeing a city from a distance,” Ambrozy says. “From another, you are standing in a construction zone.”

“These works are as much a critique of architecture as they are architecture,” says Serpentine Gallery curator Hans Ulrich Obrist, who first worked with the artist on “China Power Station” in 2006. Drawing parallels between Liu Wei’s work and the cutting of buildings done by Gordon Matta-Clark, Obrist explains that Liu Wei is interested in the amnesia that occurs in Chinese society as the architecture of urban spaces is torn down and reconstructed. “He builds a crystal palace made out of recycled materials but, in this way, he is as much anti-architecture and anti-urbanism as he is an urbanist,” says Obrist.

As Long As I See It—No. 3, 2006, composed of a Polaroid and a refrigerator chopped in half. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND LEHMANN MAUPIN, NEW YORK AND HONG KONGhttp://www.artnews.com/2014/02/26/liu-wei-chinas-trickster-mixer-upper-artist/


My images of the White Cube: